The Turner Prize is awarded annually to an artist under fifty, born, living or working in Britain, for an outstanding exhibition or public presentation of their work anywhere in the world in the previous year. Since it was set up in 1984, the Turner Prize has become one of the best-known visual arts prizes. Each year, four artists are shortlisted, and the prize awarded for an outstanding exhibition or other presentation in the preceding year. The prize is awarded purely on the exhibition or presentation the artist was nominated for. Although the shortlisted artists show their work in a Turner Prize exhibition, that exhibition has no bearing on the decision. The artists can choose to show any recent work and they make their selection in collaboration with curators from Tate Britain.To begin with, the prize could be awarded to anyone working in the arts (including curators, critics or gallery directors) for the ‘greatest contribution’ to art. But in 1988 this changed and the prize was awarded to artists only. In 1991, it changed again to introduce the age limit of 50, clarifying that the prize was not a ‘lifetime achievement’ award. The Turner Prize award is £40,000. £25,000 goes to the winner and £5,000 each goes to the other shortlisted artists.

The Turner Prize 2016 exhibition showcases the work of the four nominees: Michael Dean, Anthea Hamilton, Helen Marten and Josephine Pryde. This year the winner of the Turner Prize is Helen Marten . (search from: http://www.tate.org.uk/turner-prize/about )

Helen Marten

Helen Marten was born in 1985 in Macclesfield. She lives and works in London. She uses sculpture, screen printing and her own writing to produce installations that are full of references, from the contemporary to the historical, and the everyday to the enigmatic. For the Turner Prize she brings together a range of handmade and found objects drawn from daily life and more unusual sources (including cotton buds, coins, shoe soles, limes, marbles, eggs, snooker chalk and snakeskin). Her collage-like gatherings of objects and images have a playful intent, creating poetic visual puzzles that seem to invite us into a game or riddle. (search from: http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/turner-prize-2016/about-artists/helen-marten )

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Brood and Bitter Pass, 2015
Steel; Aluminium; Model Board; Ash; Cherry; chipboard; sprayed MDF; blown glass; glazed ceramic; screen printed Latex; bucket; cast Resin; cast Jesmonite; stones; cast Rubber; flocked aluminium; gold leaf; cotton; nails; magnets; heating filament; lace; vinyl; twig; glass beaker; cast concrete; brass; Neoprene rubber; stitched and embroidered fabric; airbrushed steel; cardboard; sand; sugar; felt; oyster shell
Overall: 118 1/2 x 321 5/8 x 44 inches (301 x 816.9 x 111.8 cm)

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On aerial greens (haymakers), 2015
Part 1: lacquered hardwood, steel, shoe soles, rubber, cast rubber, cast resin, stitched fabric, pipe tubing, galvanised cardboard, string, stamped baking paper, limes, marbles, embroidered fabric
Part 2: screen printed suede, leather and PVC, hand thrown glazed ceramic, lacquered hardwood, Formica, cast resin, cast rubber, woven straw
91 7/8 x 180 1/2 x 18 1/2 inches (233.5 x 458.5 x 47 cm)(search from:http://www.greenenaftaligallery.com/artists/helen-marten )

 

Michael Dean

Michael Dean was born in 1977 in Newcastle upon Tyne. He lives and works in London. He  starts his work with writing – which he then gives physical form. He creates moulds and casts of his words, abstracting and distorting them into an alphabet of human-scale shapes, using materials that are instantly recognisable from everyday life such as concrete, steel, soil, sand and corrugated sheet metal.Dean’s sculptures aren’t intended to be read as recognisable words, but he does want us to see an element of language in their forms – to be able to imagine a word or idea. Parts of his sculptures often resemble the human body: tongues, limbs, eyes, and casts of his family’s fists appear among the forms – directly referring to our bodies as we move through the gallery and around his works.

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Clockwise from top left
Installation view of Sic Glyphs 2016, South London Gallery, Image courtesy of the artist, Herald St, London, Mendes Wood DM, Sao Paulo, Supportico Lopez, Berlin, Photo: Andy Keate
Photo of Michael Dean Photo taken by the artist
Installation view of Sic Glyphs 2016, South London Gallery, Image courtesy of the artist, Herald St, London, Mendes Wood DM, Sao Paulo, Supportico Lopez, Berlin, Photo: Andy Keate (search from:http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/turner-prize-2016/about-artists/michael-dean)

Anthea Hamilton

Anthea Hamilton was born in 1978 in London. She lives and works in London.Research is at the heart of Anthea Hamilton’s work, whether it is into art nouveau design, the roots of 1970’s disco or lichen. Each subject is studied closely and used as a lens through which to view the world. Hamilton talks of being strongly influenced by the early 20th century French writer and dramatist Antonin Artaud and his call for the ‘physical knowledge of images’. It is this bodily response to an idea or an image that she wants us to experience when we encounter her work and its use of unexpected materials, scale and humour.

Project for a Door (After Gaetano Pesce) is a large backside (or ‘butt’) inspired by a photograph showing a model by Italian designer Gaetano Pesce. Originally intended as a doorway into a New York apartment block, the work was never realised. Project for a Door is part of a series by Hamilton of larger than life-size remakes, physical realisations of images taken from her archive.andreahamiltonturnerprize.jpgClockwise from top left
Portrait of Anthea Hamilton, Photo by Lewis Ronald
Project for Door (After Gaetano Pesce), 2015 installation view, Anthea Hamilton: Lichen! Libido! Chastity!, SculptureCenter, 2015, Courtesy the artist, Photo: Kyle Knodell
Brick Suit, 2010, installation view, Anthea Hamilton: Lichen! Libido! Chastity! SculptureCenter, 2015, Wool, lining, 22 x 5 x 46 inches (55.9 x 12.7 x 116.8 cm), Courtesy the artist. Photo: Kyle Knodell (search from:http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/turner-prize-2016/about-artists/anthea-hamilton )

Josephine Pryde

Josephine Pryde was born in 1967 in Alnwick, Northumberland. She lives and works in London and Berlin.Josephine Pryde uses photography and sculpture to explore the nature of image making and display. For the Turner Prize she has created new works using domestic kitchen worktops. To make these pieces, Pryde placed objects on the back of the worktops and then exposed them to sunlight in London, Athens and Berlin. The resulting marks are reminiscent of photograms, a cameraless photographic technique developed by early photographers but often associated with experimental 20th century photography.

For its presentation here at Tate Britain, the train, as the adapted title of the piece suggests, is temporarily static, elevated on a platform and awaiting its next move.
Pryde’s ongoing series of photographs, Hands “Für Mich”, resemble fashion or advertising images. They are closely cropped and focus on the models’ upper body and hands, which are touching objects such as phones, computer tablets, driftwood and notebooks. Our attention is drawn to the point at which the body and the object meet and to the gestures the hands perform.

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Portrait of Anthea Hamilton, Photo by Lewis Ronald
Project for Door (After Gaetano Pesce), 2015 installation view, Anthea Hamilton: Lichen! Libido! Chastity!, SculptureCenter, 2015, Courtesy the artist, Photo: Kyle Knodell
Brick Suit, 2010, installation view, Anthea Hamilton: Lichen! Libido! Chastity! SculptureCenter, 2015, Wool, lining, 22 x 5 x 46 inches (55.9 x 12.7 x 116.8 cm), Courtesy the artist. Photo: Kyle Knodell (search from:http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/turner-prize-2016/about-artists/josephine-pryden)

 

 

 

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